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Where in D.C.?

Every year, millions of people visit Washington, D.C. and go to many of the traditional attractions, such as the Smithsonian museums and national memorials. What some overlook is that D.C. has even more to offer. Whether venturing into the Northeast quadrant of the city or down to the Georgetown waterfront, there is always a little known spot that is rich in history and culture just waiting to be found.

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Columns formerly located on the East Portico of the National Capitol Building sit on a hilltop at the unusually located US National Arboretum. The columns have been at the Arboretum since the 1980's and are an obscure, lesser known DC attraction.

Columns formerly located on the East Portico of the National Capitol Building sit on a hilltop at the unusually located US National Arboretum. The columns have been at the Arboretum since the 1980's and are an obscure, lesser known DC attraction. 1Picture by Molly EllisonSurrounded by trees and only a short walk from the columns, visitors to the arboretum can peer through branches and see smokestacks off in the city. The arboretum is located on a hilltop in the Northeast quadrant of DC and has nearly 450 acres filled with trees, gardens, and roads. 2Picture by Molly EllisonA. Litteri, Incorporated is an Italian wholesale market located in near Gallaudet University in DC. The area the shop is located in is a maze of warehouses and parking lots filled with vans and trucks, resembling an industrial park in Newark more than the Nation's Capitol. 3Picture by Molly EllisonThis run down warehouse right next to the New York Avenue Metro Station is the site of the Beatle's first concert ever in the United States. Before the Beatle's came to town, the building was a minor league hockey arena. Now, the building sits covered in graffiti and is used as a parking garage. 4Picture by Molly EllisonThese gargoyles, sculpted to look like frogs and other bizarre creatures, sit atop a very famous building located on Wisconsin Avenue in Northwest DC. 5Picture by Molly EllisonThe site of the distinctive gargoyles is none other than the National Cathedral. Construction for the building started in 1907 and continued until the late 1960's, this gave over sixty years for stone masons to put in exhaustive, detailed work on the hundreds of gargoyles located all around the Cathedral's exterior. 6Picture by Molly EllisonThe Georgetown Waterfront has several big boathouses, including Potomac Boat Club and Thompson's Boat Club, but none are quite like the quaint Jack's Boathouse. Nestled in between trees and down a quiet road right on the shore of the Potomac River, Jack's rents canoes and kayak's. 7Picture by Molly EllisonThough rundown, this house has historic value because it was built before the city of Washington even existed. Located down the street from Eastern Market in Southeast DC, the house was once sat on a plantation and was visited by George Washington. 8Picture by Molly EllisonReflecting a darker time in American History, this is the building in which President Lincoln was embalmed after being assassinated. The building, located on Capitol Hill, now houses the Folger Shakespeare Library's offices. 9Picture by Molly EllisonDepicting one of the most beloved Shakespeare characters of all time, this statue of Puck from "A Midsummer Night's Dream", sits on the grounds of the Folger Shakespeare Library and faces the Library of Congress. 10Picture by Molly EllisonLocated on the grounds of the Old Soldier's Home in a residential area of the city, Lincoln's Cottage sits open to visitors. Lincoln lived in the cottage off and on throughout the Civil War and the building was opened to the public only three years ago.11Picture by Molly Ellison

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