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Friday, August 18, 2017 6:47 am
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How much parental involvement is just right? Abigail Landesman
How much parental involvement is just right?

It takes a village

Some Blair students have parents who check Edline religiously, help with homework and donít let their children leave the house unmonitored. Others opt for complete freedom, letting their children party and take care of their own business without oversight. Most high school parents fall somewhere between these two extremes, and it begs the question: how much parental involvement is just right?

Out of this world planet names

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Protecting the party

Loud rap music blasts throughout the house, the floor vibrating on account of the bass. A soft haze has settled around packed rooms that were nearly vacant only an hour ago. Bottles of alcohol adorn the messy counters and tables around which laughing teenagers converse. This is a typical night for many students who choose to party on the weekend, with the exception of a single individual standing by the door attentively.

From the lab to the kitchen

After school on Thursdays, most students are doing homework, playing sports or relaxing at home. Unbeknownst to many Blazers, a science classroom on Blair's third floor buzzes with activity. The smell of freshly baked bread permeates the room. A toaster oven sits on a countertop adjacent to a cooling loaf of bread. Nearby, students crowd around a table, shaking a mason jar full of cream, laughing. Chemistry is at work.

Technology tries to put an end to stranger danger

Tinder, Uber and other services that rely on the trust of strangers are changing the way people interact online. Technology is making it easier and faster to meet, talk to, and work with strangers. But is it safe?

Bumper stickers of Blair

For the students who drive themselves to school everyday, the car that they take can be one of two things. In the style of "Humans of New York," these are the bumper stickers of Blair.

Flying forward but still looking backward

Black History Month is a time to celebrate black culture and history, which has had an immeasurable impact on America and the world, while acknowledging the hardships the black community has faced. Students learn about black history in classes and through Sankofa.
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Feature Quote

"I like to travel with teens because I like to watch them see the world for the first time" - Anne Cullen