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May 8, 2011

SCOping out thrift stores and flea markets

by Liv Jacobson, Online Entertainment Editor
Although it's hard to believe, summer is almost upon us. The weather is getting nicer every day- and if you try really hard - you can smell the ocean breeze. With new seasons come new fashions that change almost monthly and paying for new summer styles can add up. Thankfully, thrift stores and flea markets offer unique opportunities for shoppers to maintain their style on a budget. Flea markets are especially appropriate for those nice summer days where you just want to spend the day enjoying the weather, and not stuck inside a stuffy store. Here at SCO, our fashion expert Liv has picked the best thrift stores and flea markets that will satisfy your shopping needs without cleaning out your wallet.
Value Village, located on University Boulevard in Hyattsville, sells a wide range of goods and even displays some outside. Molly Ellison
Value Village, located on University Boulevard in Hyattsville, sells a wide range of goods and even displays some outside.


Best bargain: Value Village
One of the most popular thrift shops in the region, Value Village has earned its place on this list of best D.C. area thrift stores. The sheer expansiveness of Value Village can be overwhelming and searching through hundreds of outdated fashions can be exhausting, but the end result is definitely worth it. Shoppers looking for more unique looks can certainly find them at Value Village. Wardrobe basics aren’t in short supply either; you can find a huge selection of those essential pieces at the store as well. The best part of the Value Village experience is that you can find fashion-forward and even genuine vintage pieces for rock-bottom prices. Value Village is a definite must for both bargain hunters and fashionistas alike.

Value Village is open 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 am to 6 pm on Sundays

Best outdoor atmosphere: Georgetown Flea Market
For those looking to enjoy some summer sun and Georgetown's fun atmosphere, the Georgetown Flea Market is the perfect destination. The flea market is one of the largest flea markets in the D.C. area and hosts a wide array of vendors. Furniture, art, jewelry and even bicycles are just a selection of the items offered. Only a few blocks away from the heart of Georgetown, this flea market is within walking distance of Georgetown’s main strip with expensive stores such as Betsey Johnson and Juicy Couture. You can find unique jewelry pieces and accessories at significantly cheaper prices right off the beaten path of Georgetown.

The Georgetown Flea Market is open every Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., but times are subject to inclement weather

Secondi, located near Dupont Circle, is a high-end consignment store that offers designer clothing at drastically reduced prices. Emma Lansworth
Secondi, located near Dupont Circle, is a high-end consignment store that offers designer clothing at drastically reduced prices.
Most stylish: Secondi
Everyone loves a bargain, but when expensive designer clothes become reasonably priced, the excitement can be overwhelming. This excitement can come from Secondi, a consignment store that carries top of the line designer clothing at steep discounts. Although the prices are definitely higher than at most thrift stores, the deals on high-end bags, shoes, and clothing are worth it for those who have designer tastes and on a high school student's budget. The store, just a block away from the Dupont Circle Metro, is elegant and well decorated, but is not too stuck-up or snotty for high school students to enjoy. With Betsey Johnson sweaters, Coach handbags and Michael Kors skirts abound, Secondi has a lot to offer for those who seek out couture style for thrifty prices.

Secondi is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Saturdays. On Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays the store is open from 11 a.m. to 7p.m., and on Sundays it is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m..

Best indoor atmosphere: Mustard Seed
Boutique second-hand store, Mustard Seed, is located on Wisconsin Avenue, just a block from the Bethesda Metro. Molly Ellison
Boutique second-hand store, Mustard Seed, is located on Wisconsin Avenue, just a block from the Bethesda Metro.

Mustard Seed, like Secondi, is a consignment store; however Mustard Seed has much lower prices and mid-range quality clothes. Its convenient location across the street from the Bethesda Metro station makes it easily accessible for Blair students and its attractive pricing will keep you coming back. There are a wide variety of clothes ranging from original vintage to brand new merchandise at delightfully low costs. One advantage that Mustard Seed has over its competitors is its consciousness of the season: there were no heavy sweaters or coats in sight this time of year, unlike some of the other previously mentioned stores. With interesting changing rooms, fun decorations and loads of colorful clothing, the funky, unique atmosphere of this store made it seem like a high-end boutique, but with lower-end prices.

Mustard Seed is open from 11 a.m. to 7p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays.



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  • ABC on May 9, 2011 at 9:19 AM
    To be honest, I highly dislike Mustard Seed personally. The girls there are snotty and the service is bad. When selling your own clothes to them, they are very picky and kind of pick at your clothes as if they are dirty. HATE this place.
  • rice cooker reviews (View Email) on May 16, 2011 at 5:19 PM
    Thanks, Barbara. It's a scanned photograph of a barn near our home. At the time of the photo, that farm belonged to an elderly lady who had her entire acreage in CRP (a farm program that gave her a payment for letting the land lie idle). It's not too far from our house. The buzzards roosted there on summer nights and we could hear them "cooing" sometimes. Now the farm is owned by a Mennonite family, and they use the old barn to store their farm equipment. There's enough activity in the area that the buzzards don't roost there anymore. http://www.ricecookersreviews.net
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