Silver Chips Online

Cosmos: Why spreading science is necessary

By Jacob Popper, Op/Ed Editor
March 2, 2014
The debate between Bill Nye "The Science Guy" and Creation Museum founder Ken Ham concerning Evolution vs. Creationism that aired on NPR a few weeks ago was declared by most to be a tie. However, on the new FOX show "Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey" host Neil deGrasse Tyson takes us on a scientific journey, on which he settles the debate once and for all by saying "the theory of evolution, like the theory of gravity, is a scientific fact." This, in my opinion, was one of the best things to happen to television in a long time.
Cosmos Host Neil deGrasse Tyson (left) is building upon the original "Cosmos" that aired in the 1980s with host Carl Sagan (right). Courtesy of Two Nerds in Love
Cosmos Host Neil deGrasse Tyson (left) is building upon the original "Cosmos" that aired in the 1980s with host Carl Sagan (right).

Through the ages, science has proven correct many things that were previously just "theories" and evolution is no different. But for some reason American society, empowered by media outlets that display both sides, is so keen on not sounding conservative or liberal that they debate scientific fact. ESPN doesn't continuously debate who won last year's Super Bowl, nor do pundits debate the results of the 2012 presidential election, because those are events that have already taken place. They are done, over with, finished, terminated—whatever other words you want to add on. Evolution is no different.

This is just another part of the conservative war on science, and it's certainly not the job of the media to seem fair minded, it is their duty to report the truth. Evolution, global warming and other issues need to be addressed for what they are: fact. The fact that there's a creation museum is simply mind boggling. Not that it shouldn't be allowed to exist, but it should not be given an ounce of credibil.

Fortunately, we have "Cosmos," ironically aired on FOX (owned by archconservative media magnate Rupert Murdoch) at nine p.m. on Sundays. With its awesome animation and extremely descriptive approach, everyone can tune in and learn more about how the world works, and how we have explained it through science. The first episode barely touched on evolution, but did enough to prompt an Oklahoma Fox 5 station to "accidentally" play a news promo over the evolution section.Hopefully Cosmos' other 8.5-10 million viewers will get to learn more scientific "theories" that are really facts.

http://silverchips.mbhs.edu/story/12485