Silver Chips Online

Making trickin' treats

How to create edible Halloween body parts

By Julia Wynn, Online Connections and Food Editor
October 31, 2009
The day is approaching. Streets are lined with grinning pumpkins and bushes are adorned in cotton cobwebs. Soon every child will be visiting houses in various costumes, hunting for candy with shouts of: "Trick or treat!" But there is something eerier than candy that people can offer neighboring children: human body parts - the edible version that is. Maybe kids would rather swipe a Reese's, but these dishes are great crowd-pleasers at Halloween parties. Getting people to eat these treats is the real trick.

Spleen/Brain
The human spleen is a dark, fairly oval-shaped organ about the size of a fist. Black Cherry Jell-O provides an excellent imitation of its color and appearance; thus, it serves as the main ingredient for this adaptation of edible spleen. Make sure to start preparation at least four hours before the party to allow time for the Jell-O to solidify in the refrigerator. Beware: especially after the artful fork prodding is complete, this dish has a very disgusting appearance. To make a brain, follow the same steps using a lighter colored Jell-O flavor, such as peach. Brain molds can be purchased online, but the recipe below provides a simpler alternative.

Prep time is about four hours. Makes one overly large spleen or two normal spleens.

Kitchenware:
- medium bowl
- spoon
- refrigerator
- medium plate
- fork or skewer
- large pot (if necessary)

Ingredients:
- 1 Jell-O package
- 1 cup hot water
- 1 cup cold water

Using a medium-sized bowl, follow the instructions on individually wrapped Jello-O packages to make a full batch of Jell-O.
When the Jell-O is firm, take out of refrigerator and turn bowl upside down to plop the spleen onto a serving plate. If the Jell-O is still too cold, try placing the bowl in a pot of hot water to soften it.
After the spleen is on the plate, cut it in two to make two spleens.
For a brain: Run a fork or skewer along the Jell-O to make realistic indentations that mimic the texture of a brain.
Serve and watch the reactions!

Eyeballs
Yes, we are going to use grapes. But this recipe also includes a way to create pupils that people often neglect in edible eyeballs. Don't expect an eye-openingly (ha ha) marvelous taste. The flavor combination is satisfactory but keep in mind this dish's primary purpose - to imitate a human eyeball visually.

Prep time is about 30 seconds per eyeball. Makes as many eyeballs as desired.

Kitchenware:
- 1 small knife

Ingredients:
- grapes (amount can vary depending on the number of eyeballs desired)
- chocolate chips

Peel the grapes with a knife or your fingers, whichever is easier. To make the skin more compliant, run hot water over the grape and the skin will slide off with little effort. (Leaving some evidence of the skin is effective because it imitates red veins in the eyeballs.)
Stick one chocolate chip - the pupil - in the center of each grape.
Repeat for as many grapes as required.
Serve and watch the reactions!

Meaty hands
The appearance of this particular dish is probably the most convincing. Additional sliced almonds for nails further enhance its authenticity. More creative - or maybe just creepier - cooks will add rings or paint the "nails" after the meat is cooked.

Prep time is about 30 minutes. Makes two small hands.

Kitchenware:
- fork or skewer
- medium or large pan
- stove
- spatula

Ingredients:
- 5 light-colored sausage links, they will darken as they cook (about 1.24 lb.)
- sliced almonds
- 3 tbsp. olive oil

Thaw sausage and shape into a pancake form for the palm with long, thinner pieces for the fingers.
Pour the olive oil into the pan and set stove to medium heat.
Attach the "fingers" to the "palm" by meshing the ends of the raw meat together.
Place one sliced almond on the tip of each "finger."
Carefully lay each "hand" into the pan; try not to lose a "nail"!
Cook until brown or meat is able to stick together, about 10 minutes.
Serve and watch the reactions!

http://silverchips.mbhs.edu/story/9599