Silver Chips Online

Tweet tweet

By Jenna Bushnell, Online Features and Humor Editor
January 26, 2010
As a senior, I've admittedly had a difficult time sitting down and focusing on the piles of homework that I have (second semester, you're almost here!). Recently, with final exams, I've found myself having an even harder time staying on track. And, in all of my distracted glory, I've gotten myself a Twitter.

Casey Goldvale
No. I refuse to tweet and I will not be posting my Twitter account for curious readers to see. So why get a twitter then? Because, despite the general worthlessness of Tweets, there is something totally amusing about following a celebrity's day to day life. Paris Hilton is watching television in bed? Glad to know. Gilbert Arenas wants to see a funny movie to take away from the fact that he's ruined his career? Awesome! David Blayne is performing magic (or so he says) for five days straight in New York City? Totally important!

Once a critic of all things twitter, I've begun to understand why it's so profound. Arguably, celebrities' thoughts should be filtered. Twitter, however, provides an opportunity for them to freely release their feelings to millions of people. While potentially dangerous to their careers (see already tanking Arenas), it's still a fascinating window into the lives of others.

Let's face it, People magazine and websites like TMZ.com thrive off of us regular people's curiosity for the fabulous life. But, what makes Twitter even more substantial than the rest is the ability for fans to interact with their favorite celebrities. I'm following the tweets of Kevin Smith, who spends a lot of time answering the questions of fans. Albeit Kevin Smith really isn't doing much else these days, it's still incredible to see such an interaction occur between people who otherwise would have never been able to communicate with each other.

Everyone from Barack Obama to the Red Cross uses Twitter to reach millions. And while most Twitter accounts are from average folk with average lives but something to say, it's still an opportunity to learn more about someone that you might not have immediately picked up from a conversation.

In an age of Facebook stalking and blog surfing, almost all of us can admit that the quest for knowledge and information about everything and everyone is incredibly appealing. So, yes, Twitter in itself is an inherently narcissistic outlet for people to talk about themselves, but it also provides an opportunity to see the way other people live, even if it's just for a tiny Tweet.

http://silverchips.mbhs.edu/story/9822