Silver Chips Online

Letter to the editor: reconsidering year-round school

By
December 17, 2009
Sophomore Sara Sium wrote this letter to the editor in response to the Silver Chips article Is year-round schooling an effective alternative to the traditional calendar?

This is my letter to you to comment on the article “Is year-round schooling an effective alternative to the traditional calendar?” [p. 3, Nov. 12]. When my English teacher, Mrs. Pundzak, handed out the newspapers to read, it was one of the articles that grabbed my attention. The reason it captured my attention was for the reason that this subject can really affect my day-to-day life. Although I had heard of this subject before, I was not well aware of the subject or its details. I am pretty sure my first reaction to the idea of having school year-round was, like most students, very opposed to it, but this article has helped me see “both sides of the story.” It helped me to be informed of something that can possibly occur in the near future. Even though both arguments were convincing, I agree with Laura Anthony. Her argument saying that students retain more information in the year-round system has been proven right throughout my school years. Most of the time, when I return to school after summer vacation, the education I obtained the year before doesn’t come easily. With reviews done by teachers, I eventually remember, but if there were year-round schooling the reviews wouldn’t be necessary. Although I agree with Anthony, I want the traditional schooling system to remain the same. Having vacation for two months is better than having it scattered! This article was entertaining to read, and I thought it was well-written. The style and presentation of the work were clear and easy to understand. Keep up the good work, Silver Chips!
-sophomore Sara Sium

Signed letters to the editor may be submitted to room 158, silver.chips.print@gmail.com or Joseph Fanning’s mailbox in the main office. Letters may be edited for space or clarity.

http://silverchips.mbhs.edu/story/9907