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Thursday, October 19, 2017 6:58 am
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Obon Society founders Rex and Keiko Ziak display the <i> hinomaru yosegaki </i>  they hope to return
Courtesy of The Obon Society
Obon Society founders Rex and Keiko Ziak display the hinomaru yosegaki they hope to return

WII relics returned to rightful heirs

The smoke clears and the dust begins to settle. Thousands of US marines wander the small island of Peleliu as Japanese soldiers, planes, and cruisers retreat in the distance. The Battle of Peleliu is over. The 13 square kilometer island is finally under US control. Marines explore the deserted tunnel systems, caves and bunkers, now abandoned by the Japanese 14th infantry division.

Volvo's bold commitment

Volvo declares it will discontinue manufacturing vehicles powered solely by fossil fuels.

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Excitement and obstacles in portable rollout

At the far end of Blair, past the SAC doors and the student courtyard, sit four brand new portables, a mass of beige and wood lazing in the afternoon sun. The portables, a result of Blair's expanding student population, are a new addition meant to help with the increasing Blazer population.

It takes a village

Some Blair students have parents who check Edline religiously, help with homework and donít let their children leave the house unmonitored. Others opt for complete freedom, letting their children party and take care of their own business without oversight. Most high school parents fall somewhere between these two extremes, and it begs the question: how much parental involvement is just right?

Protecting the party

Loud rap music blasts throughout the house, the floor vibrating on account of the bass. A soft haze has settled around packed rooms that were nearly vacant only an hour ago. Bottles of alcohol adorn the messy counters and tables around which laughing teenagers converse. This is a typical night for many students who choose to party on the weekend, with the exception of a single individual standing by the door attentively.

From the lab to the kitchen

After school on Thursdays, most students are doing homework, playing sports or relaxing at home. Unbeknownst to many Blazers, a science classroom on Blair's third floor buzzes with activity. The smell of freshly baked bread permeates the room. A toaster oven sits on a countertop adjacent to a cooling loaf of bread. Nearby, students crowd around a table, shaking a mason jar full of cream, laughing. Chemistry is at work.

Technology tries to put an end to stranger danger

Tinder, Uber and other services that rely on the trust of strangers are changing the way people interact online. Technology is making it easier and faster to meet, talk to, and work with strangers. But is it safe?
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Feature Quote

"I like to travel with teens because I like to watch them see the world for the first time" - Anne Cullen