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Dec. 15, 2006

SGR launches Darfur call-in campaign during lunch

by Julia Mazerov, Online Entertainment Editor and Elsi Wu, Online Sports Editor
Students for Global Responsibility's (SGR) campaign to promote awareness on the genocide in Darfur continued today with a call-in session on Blair Boulevard across from the guidance office during 5A and 5B lunches.

The call-in was the second of a two-part program being launched by SGR to raise awareness and promote action among students for more U.S. involvement to end Darfur's ongoing genocide.
Freshman Philip Mallari joins Blazers in the Sudan call-in campaign. Eve Gleichman
Freshman Philip Mallari joins Blazers in the Sudan call-in campaign.

According to SGR member Avi Edelman, students were permitted to use cell phones to call in and read provided scripts to a number of lawmakers that represent Montgomery County, including Senator Barbara Mikulski, Senator-elect Ben Cardin, Representative Albert Wynn and Congressman Chris Van Hollen. The scripts detailed the informal death count of over 400,000 in Darfur and urged policymakers to take action by increasing U.S. military presence in the area.

Edelman reported that by the middle of 5B, over 250 calls had been made to representatives, with mostly positive responses from the four representatives. Although some students had their messages cut short, Van Hollen's camp was "very receptive, and most callers were able to read the entire message," Edelman said. The offices of Ben Cardin and Barbara Mikulski were closed, but students filled up their mailboxes with messages encouraging action in Darfur. The student effort has been so effective, Edelman reported, that the office of Albert Wynn contacted club sponsor George Vlasits to stop the calls, and has agreed to meet with club leaders to discuss possible legislative action. Still, Edelman encouraged students to continue making calls. "If we're jamming their phone lines, they will hear about the issue and take action," he said.

SGR was pleased with event's turnout. "I'm really excited to see Blazers step up to bring this issue to the attention of politicians," Edelman said. "Right now, genocide is not being treated as a political issue, and it's important to remind politicians that students care, that constituents care."
Freshman Safarah Khan makes a call to a congressman. Eve Gleichman
Freshman Safarah Khan makes a call to a congressman.

Blazers were impressed by the SGR's effort to both press the issue and educate students about the situation. "Even if they didn't know about what was happening in Darfur, students were attracted by the crowd and wanted to know what was going on," said junior Areeb Quasem. "They'd go up and talk to the people running the event, who would then tell them all about the issue and what was happening. It's a really good thing that Blair did this. " Sophomore Xenia Oroxom agreed, stating that Blair's large population offers an advantage in provoking change. "Since Blair is such a huge school, if we get everyone together, then we actually have a huge chance to make a big difference," she said.

Many students thought the campaign would prove to be effective. "I think that this will help, even if only a little," said freshman Julia Skolnik. "It feels good, you feel like you did something."

A presentation from Rebecca Glade, member of the Georgetown University chapter of Students Against Genocide Coalition (STAND) preceded today's call-in campaign. Glade addressed the ongoing genocide in the Darfur region in Sudan at 2:15 yesterday afternoon.

Yesterday's presentation focused on educating students on the situation in Darfur, the first part of SGR's threefold attempt to urge education, advocacy, and donation among Blazers. After a short film and presentation, Glade then facilitated questions from concerned students which ranged from the U.N.'s peacekeeping involvement to what company investments directly fund the region's militarism. Edelman agreed with Glade's assertion that the genocide can be addressed on both ends of the political spectrum. "Its not a political issue, it's a human rights issue and both Democrats and Republicans should do something about it," he said today.

Edelman summed up SGR's approach to the Darfur genocide in three simple words: "Educate, advocate, donate."

Additional reporting contributed by Hokuma Karimova



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  • hello? (View Email) on December 15, 2006 at 2:29 PM
    I don't what to be cynical, but really this is a good intention that goes about in the wrong direction.

    First, increase military presence? Are you serious? We've already spread ourselves pretty thin, don't you think? Sure, you'll say, but Iraq was wrong and all the other things. But really, you're a little too late. We're already in Iraq and you can't do anything about it. Increasing presence in Darfur is both not simple or practical.

    Second, "jamming their phone lines" for action? You impede other calls that are important as well. You do not consider the fact that others need help too. OK, what's happening in Darfur is wrong. Great. But you know, even as a superpower, America cannot do everything. You have to understand that. Don't hurt the system for just one cause. All those phone calls are unnecessary. OK, you want to be heard. Well, phone calls are not practical. You're acting immaturely and too hastily.

    I'm sure you mean only good. You don't want such tragedies to continue occuring in the Darfur region. I understand. But you need to go about in a more responsible action. Getting the attention of congresspeople is not best achieved through constant phone calls. You need a more practical method.

    "Filling up mailboxes"? Come on. Be mature. Know when to stop.

    Really, good intentions. I support your ideas but not your actions. Don't be foolish, be smart.

    Be responsible in your ways of going about getting the attention of congresspeople.

    Please, be responsible. Be courteous. Don't take unnecessary actions. Be smart.
  • X on December 15, 2006 at 3:38 PM
    GO PHILIP!!!
  • Amina Aden (View Email) on December 15, 2006 at 5:33 PM
    I Called 4 times. I think it was a great thing for them to do and I think we actually made a difference!
  • rhonda varsane (View Email) on December 15, 2006 at 9:25 PM
    Bless you.

    If we could do the same throughout all countries and have an international affect while educating the world of the problem.

    photographer/journalist
    972.948.7498
    Call me if you need my help
    Events Worldwide magazine.

    I would love to have additional information
  • Libertarian (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 12:42 AM
    I fully support raising awareness of the problem and getting aid to these people, but I'd like to ask one question.

    What's the difference between this and Iraq when Saddam was in power? I hear many people say they wish Saddam were still in power now that it would be better with him than the current situation. I disagree with that but I do agree the war was a bad idea. It isn't worth the lives of American soldiers to save foreign citizens from their own government when we have people starving on the streets of our country. I disagreed with the Iraq war on those grounds and I disagree with any military action for that reason. Now if we can get aid to them, pressure their government politically, and possibly get a UN force together to be a major threat that would attack if the genocide was not stopped, I could support it. But if it's handled the same way as the Iraq war, it could get ugly, as we can see.

    Now I know this article isn't trying to be political, but I'd like to make one quick point. This is using almost all the same reasons for military action as the reasons for invading Iraq, minus WMDs. Maybe this is how people around here would have reacted had a liberal President invaded Iraq. It's funny to see how when a very similar situation comes up yet it's a different party supporting the other side, people continue to go for their party rather than principle, and that's sad on both sides. In this case the Republicans win. At least they're consistent in wanting to get military help to oppressed people. Don't worry, they do this kind of thing all the time too, but I can't help but wonder how people would have reacted if Gore had been elected and decided to invade Iraq (there are a few quotes from him saying that he was 100% sure Iraq had WMDs, so I wouldn't be surprised if he had done it if elected). I'm pretty sure Republicans would be saying the exact same things Democrats are saying now and vice versa.

    But I applaud SGR in raising awareness off this issue, and hope that they do not attempt to fight to increase military presence, at least not alone. Our military is already stretched, people are at war for years longer than they were scheduled to be. But just remember, be it Iraq or Darfur, a decrease in troops means worse conditions for the citizens of the other country. So is saving these lives worth the lives of American soldiers that we will lose? Can we assume a quick attack and get out approach? Worked well in Iraq right?
  • Fegley (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 1:10 AM
    To Clarify: The article says that the students were demanding a U.S. military presence in Darfur. In actuality, the script from which the callers were reading demanded a UN peacekeeping force, not a United States military force.

    From the script itself, our first demand was that: "a UN Peacekeeping force must be deployed immediately."

    Granted, the United States, as a global superpower, does not reserve the right to police the rest of the world. The international community, as a whole, must come together if this genocide is to end. But as the most powerful nation on earth, the United States is placed in a unique position. If any country can lead the international community into taking action, it is the United States. As a Superpower, it is our responsibility to speak out when atrocities like those in Sudan are occurring.

    As for the Call-In Day, I would argue that our phone calls were a very effective way of taking action. The sad truth is that politicians often (mistakenly) interpret public silence as public indifference. By flooding their phone lines, the Blair students were sending a direct message to our representatives: this is an issue we care about. The call-in day places direct pressure on our senators and congress poeple to take legislative action to end the genocide. The more calls that we make, the more resounding our message is.

    When 400,000 have been killed, over 2.5 million displaced, and thousands brutally raped, we have a moral obligation to speak out. Hopefully, the call-in day allowed people to do this.
  • me on December 16, 2006 at 10:12 AM
    this is the stupidest idea ever. YES it is a good cause, but maybe instead of the same person getting 948340 calls from MBHS and getting extremley sick of it, efforts could of went into something a bit more productive
  • props on December 16, 2006 at 11:02 AM
    great reporting, ladies!
  • Elsa Haag (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 12:26 PM
    Our count shows that more than 500 calls were made in total!
  • alumnae3 (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 12:41 PM
    @boh shin tang:
    I dont think MBHS calling the congree reps for 2 hrs jammed up the phone lines in Congree. If they did, shame on Congress! Wynn, Hollen, Mikikulshi, & Cardin rep us! They should expect to hear from us and should be prepared to handle the volume! Always youth are criticsed for not being involved, and now that they are they are being told by Wynn & u to stop calling. NO! We will stop calling, writing,& protesting when WE SEE A CHANGE! They are in office for us ,remember that!
  • Yup on December 16, 2006 at 2:11 PM
    I didn't get to call but I really wish I did...I think this was a really good idea and I'm glad people are intrested in this type of things because Blair (being a big school and all) can make a huge diffrece by its self so hopefully there will be more things like this!
  • 07 on December 16, 2006 at 4:17 PM
    I strongly disagree with "hello?".
    The Congresspeople represent us and so they welcome e-mails and calls from their constituents in order to know what the concerns are of the Montgomery County community so that they can bring these issues to the national level. These calls made our representatives aware that students at Montgomery Blair High School will not stand for mere idleness when genocide is occuring. You say the calls weren't smart, responsible, or courteous, but you don't offer an alternative method to make a difference. Also, you say our troops are already stretched thin from Iraq. So, because we lack resources, we should just ignore the fact that thousands have died, are at risk to being raped, are homeless, etc.? We must demand action, and if our way of going about it inconveniences a few congresspeople, so be it.
  • cat_inthehat on December 16, 2006 at 4:17 PM
    dude i knew i should of cranked called those guys.

    *sigh*

    oh well i'm just wait for next week
  • Fegley (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 5:41 PM
    To Clarify: The article says that the students were demanding a U.S. military presence in Darfur. In actuality, the script from which the callers were reading demanded a UN peacekeeping force, not a United States military force.

    From the script itself, our first demand was that: "a UN Peacekeeping force must be deployed immediately."

    Granted, the United States, as a global superpower, does not reserve the right to police the rest of the world. The international community, as a whole, must come together if this genocide is to end. But as the most powerful nation on earth, the United States is placed in a unique position. If any country can lead the international community into taking action, it is the United States. As a Superpower, it is our responsibility to speak out when atrocities like those in Sudan are occurring.

    As for the Call-In Day, I would argue that our phone calls were a very effective way of taking action. The sad truth is that politicians often (mistakenly) interpret public silence as public indifference. By flooding their phone lines, the Blair students were sending a direct message to our representatives: this is an issue we care about. The call-in day places direct pressure on our representatives to take legislative action to end the genocide. The more calls that we make, the more resounding our message is.

    When 400,000 have been killed, over 2.5 million displaced, and thousands brutally raped, we have a moral obligation to speak out. Hopefully, the call-in day allowed people to do this.
  • TO CLARIFY: on December 16, 2006 at 5:44 PM
    This is an important clarification that needs to be made: SGR did not endorse a US military force entering Sudan. They realize this needs to be an international effort. Here are their demands from the script. It's important to note that nowhere does it demand a US military force:

    -First, a UN Peacekeeping force must be deployed immediately.
    -Second, the African Union troops currently stationed in Darfur must receive more support from the United States. Currently, the AU serves as the only line of protection for millions of Darfuris.
    -The No-Fly Zone in Darfur must be enforced to prevent the Sudanese government from continuing their bombing campaign on civilians.
  • re: 07 alumnae3 (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 5:53 PM
    Still, Edelman encouraged students to continue making calls. "If we're jamming their phone lines, they will hear about the issue and take action," he said.

    Clearly the purpose was to try and jam the lines.

    Yes, youth should be involved politically. It is important. However, it is important that they are involved responsibly. They need to find a better way to get their voice heard.

    As for change, if the representatives did everything that their constituents told them, America would be in some serious trouble.

    Rethink your approach.
  • Libertarian (View Email) on December 16, 2006 at 10:00 PM
    "As for the Call-In Day, I would argue that our phone calls were a very effective way of taking action." - Fegley

    So what exactly was the action? What are you trying to get your Congressmen to do? I'm just wondering, this is not an attack. I would think they already know about it, so what specific action do you want them to take?
  • re: hello? on December 16, 2006 at 11:34 PM
    i really don't understand what you are proposing sgr should have done instead of the call-in. the only way to contact a representative or senator is to call them or write to them. one person calling or writing really doesnt carry much weight, and so sgr encouraged the students to stand together in order to make their voices heard. what is immature or impolite about that? and anyways, the congress people are in office only to listen and respond to the needs of their constituent
  • Here's an idea (View Email) on December 17, 2006 at 6:15 PM
    Let's not make a single phone call until you can tell me

    1.) The names of the militias on BOTH sides of the conflict.
    2.) The racial identity of the killers and the racial identity of the victims.
    3.) The motivations for both sides in the conflict.
    4.) The cause of the current conflict.

    Can you tell me these things? Can Fegely? Can Avi?

    For all this talk of "raising awareness" there's been no attempt to raise awareness of what this conflict is actually about. This is not ahistorical--it fits into a much larger context that nobody seems to appreciate. And unless your understanding of this is something more than "innocent people are being killed"--well then I beg you, please don't pick up your phone.
  • it's not a matter of on December 17, 2006 at 8:07 PM
    sends troops to Darfur so much as a question of the rules of engagement. Would this hypothetical peacekeeping force be there to supervise a negotiated peace between the Western rebels and Arab militias, or would it be there to militarily defeat those who are comitting this alleged genocide? It's a complicated question. It's disingenuous to call for "peacekeepers" without explaning exactly what it is you mean.
  • Fegley (View Email) on December 17, 2006 at 9:09 PM
    Since 2003, The Sudanese government has backed and sponsored militias, known as the Janjaweed, to carry out a mass campaign of genocide, systematically killing the native Africans of the land.

    The Sudan government in Khartoum is made up of Arab Africans, despite the fact that Arabs represent a minority of the population in Sudan. Two rebel groups, in particular, opposed this Sudanese government: The Sudanese Liberation Army (led by Minni Minnawi) and the Justice and Equality Movement. These two rebel groups were spawned out of Sudan's Civil War, which occured throughout the latter half of the 20th century.

    However, today's genocide began in 2003, when Sudan President Al-Bashir said that he was targeting these rebel groups because they posed a threat to the nation's security. Instead, the government-sponsored Janjaweed militia began killing all the native Africans in Sudan. Al-Bashir insists that they are just trying to elminiate the rebel groups, but we now know this is far from the truth. Since 2003, there has been a constant influx of reports of villages being burned to the ground, countless rapes, and vicious murders.

    "Here's an idea:"-- you asked me to tell you these things and I have. Quite honestly, I doubt that you will be satisfied by what I've written. But nonetheless, it's unfair to accuse me of not knowing the history behind this conflict.
  • Fegley (View Email) on December 17, 2006 at 9:25 PM
    To Libertarian:

    I understand what your saying. Clearly, our senators and representatives know about the genocide in Sudan. The goal of the call-in day was to send the message that we demand more concrete legislative action to be taken and want the genocide to remain an important issue in Congress.

    Specifically, this is what we want our representatives to push for:

    - A UN Peacekeeping Force to be deployed in Sudan, as it will send a direct message to the Sudan government that the international community will no longer allow them to perpetrate their genocide.
    -Increased funding for the small, Africa Union force that is currently on the ground in Sudan (until the UN force is deployed). In a country the size of Texas, the AU does not have the resources to secure peace.
    - NATO enforcement of the No-Fly Zone over Sudan. The no-fly zone is not being enforced, and as a result, the Sudan government is able to bomb and attack villages in Sudan, knowing that there will be no consquences.
  • senior on December 17, 2006 at 10:52 PM
    I've never heard of or seen a call-in before, and I think it is a really effective way to get the politician's attention. It is laughable that they told students to stop calling. Isn't it their job to listen to the people?


    In response to "Here's an idea":
    It is not necessary to know any of those facts about the conflict in order to know it needs to end. Hundreds of thousands of innocents have died already, so does the death toll need to reach 1 million before I can say anything? Who are you to say when I can and cannot voice my opinion on something so horrible. I do agree that informing people on those 4 issues would help...
  • someone (View Email) on December 17, 2006 at 11:07 PM
    I agree with you, we need to understand what this conflict is about before we can protest anything...
  • Eli Barnett on December 18, 2006 at 7:10 PM
    Truth be told, i really do not know much about the genocide currently taking place in darfur. That being said, the posters i have seen pretty much have shown the people running this either A. dont know either or B. Really dont want to take the time to explain a rather complex situation, as nothing like this is a straightfoward "good side" and "bad side" conflict.

    To senior: I dont want to sound rude or insensitive, but with the population growth in africa as it is, there is going to be a great deal more of this which we cant do anything about. Honestly, do you expect phone calls to a senator to solve this? The doubling time of the population in parts of africa, as of now, is absurdly low...something like 30 years. These things are unavoidable, and in a way, are a method of a population to stop itself from growing too large and starving itself, albeit horrible and violent. Population pressure causes issues, and we are not really going to resolve anything by calling people about it.

    to Here's an idea:
    I 100% agree. That is one of the reasons i did not attend, i do not know much about the conflict and i do not pretend to, and i really dont think im in a place to do anything against it.

    "If we're jamming their phone lines, they will hear about the issue and take action" - eldman

    They may hear about the issue, but what kind of action do you expect them to take? America isnt going to send troops into a country in Africa because a few senators got calls about genocide from high school students. There isnt anything that can remotely be done without a millitary presence, and with the current situation as it is, i dont think thats attainable
  • 05 grad on December 18, 2006 at 8:40 PM
    Here's the deal. I don't think anyone would disagree with helping people become aware of a tragic issue like Darfur. The problem is that they didn't quite go about it in the smartest way. Jamming phonelines? Who do you think you're kidding? As if they didn't know about the issue already? And jamming phonelines are going to "make them aware?" "Make them act?" Give me a break!

    "It is laughable that they told students to stop calling. Isn't it their job to listen to the people? " Yes, and by jamming phonelines, the students prevented them from being able to do their jobs. How about that? Quite honestly, a better idea would have been to take a visit to the Hill and talk with them, not sit there jamming the phonelines for an hour. That just plain annoys them. How'd you like telemarketers calling you for an hour? Yeah yeah, telemarketers and Darfur are different. But it's not like they don't know about Darfur already, and by jamming lines, I honestly don't know how much impact yall had.

    And as for "Here's an idea", I think he (I'm pretty sure you're a he, given the email...) makes a valid point. Seriously, how well do YOU know the issue to try to sit there and tell Congress to act?
  • here's an idea (View Email) on December 18, 2006 at 9:53 PM
    I didn't accuse you of anything. I asked if you knew what it was you were advocating for, and apparently you do. Some nitpicking: The genocide didn't spontaneously "begin"--it sprung out of dissatisfaction with the 2000 peace treaty that resolved the situation in the southern part of Sudan, which forced secular as well as moderate Islamist militias to relocate to Darfur, where they would find common cause with lower and middle class African agriculturalists who felt disenfranchised by the Arab-supremacist Khartoum regime, as well as pro-African militias trained in neighboring Chad. The regime, meanwhile, supplied and supported militants coming from racially Arab and incredibly poor pastoral and nomadic Darfurians to defeat the racially African insurgency--it is a classic albeit unbelievably complicated insurgency-counter insurgency conflict, and it is telling that SLA and JEM leaders have rejected offers for a negotiated peace, and were suspected of committing war crimes by the same U.N. commission that determined the slaughter in Darfur not to be a genocide.

    This is complex stuff. Which makes it all the more important that each and every one of you know exactly what you're doing if you make one of these calls.
  • What?? on December 19, 2006 at 7:41 AM
    I don't understand why people aren't agreeing with the actions Blair students have done to make a diffrence?? At this point in Darfur America NEEDS to do something its getting way 2 out of hand...The people who are saying the actions were wrong need 2 understand that's what the Congressmen are there 4...to listen to us and represente us...if you don't fully understand Democracy or the problem in Darfur please don't say the action of Blair students calling the Congressmen was wrong...Blair students can save a lot of peoples lives if we can get through to the Congressmen!!
  • re:here's an idea on December 19, 2006 at 4:23 PM
    The day before the call-in, SGR held a teach-in, explaining the conflict and trying to raise awareness. The CAP suite was packed. So you're saying they haven't told people the facts?
  • e in edge on December 19, 2006 at 8:37 PM
    to heres an idea:
    you have shown that the darfur conflict is very complex, good for you! but is the point of your comment to dissuade people from taking sides before they are educated, or are you saying that the terror in darfur does not warrent US intervention?
    if you believe the former, i think you are just being elitist. its great that you know everything about the conflict, but why is it wrong for someone less educated to try and help the people in sudan who are being terrorized. i am sure that you have passed judgement on events in history without being fully educated on them, and that is ok. a person does not need to know why hundreds of thousands of people are being killed, they just need to know that in any circumstance, hundreds of thousands of people dieing is wrong.
    if you believe that the US should not intervene in darfur, you are sick. truthfully, i dont believe that america has the right to police the world. but i do believe that america has a respnsibility to protect the freedoms and safety of people in other countries who are unable to stand up for themselves.
    so heres an idea, try and say something constructive next time.
  • one last idea (View Email) on December 19, 2006 at 11:42 PM
    Hundreds of thousands of people dying is wrong, and the U.S. should do something about it. The obvious question is what. The basic problem in Darfur is the militerization of opposing political blocs who have no scruples and no interest in a settled peace. The delicate nature of the situation and the west's general misunderstanding of it would doom any attempt at conventional military action. In the words of one African political scientist, the problem with a military invention is the question of who exactly you'd shoot: the Janjaweed militia that targets innocent agriculturalist civilians, or the African militias that target innocent pastoralist civilians. You'd have an Iraq-style situation in which the occupying power would have no choice but to coddle one group of militants in an attempt to impose some minimal level of order and security. It just wouldn't work.

    If, however, the U.S. treats Darfur in the same way it treated the Balkans of the mid-90s (there are a ton of similarities--too many to go into right now) and aims for an international effort at leveraging both groups into a negotiated solution and an international military presence aimed at enforcing the terms of any negotiated agreement the slaughter could eventually end. It would mean the commitment of peacekeepers for years and probably decades, as in the Balkans--something the international community at large probably would not support. And that's where it's most crucial for the U.S. to get involved--to get the international community and China especially to agree to supply personnel and resources once a lasting peace is within reach.

    So, e in edge, the complexities of this conflict should not be dismissed as irrelevant. Darfur is not a moral issue, but a political one that exists in a volatile and complicated reality. Rhetoric will not do anybody any good--least of all the people of Darfur.
  • alumnae3 (View Email) on December 20, 2006 at 1:49 PM
    @boh shin tang:
    U r going with what he literally said when of course it is a figure of speech.Edelman did not mean to just tie up phone lines unneccss, & I know we all knew that bc we chose to spend lunch making concerned phone calls.

    Since u r quick to say how irresponsible SGR i, what do u uggest? What is ur better way?

    Lastly, u say: "As for change, if the representatives did everything that their constituents told them, America would be in some serious trouble. "--bho shin tang

    WTF? We werent listened to when the bush ferret stole the presidency. We WERENT listened to and we ran blindy in2 Irag and Afghanistan
    1) so ferret jr could get ayback for his father's losses
    2) so the Bushes/cheney haliburton could make more money of defense contract and oil, while WE r the ones sending our kdis over there to die.

    My stance remains the same: We r the constitutents. Dont tell me to stop calling, emailing, faxing u: liste to me bc I voted u in. REPRESENT me since u r my REPRESENTATIVE.

    We will stop calling, writing,& protesting when WE SEE A CHANGE! They are in office for us , remember that!
  • @ (View Email) on December 20, 2006 at 1:52 PM
    @05 grad 18 dec 8:40pm:

    The phone lines werent being jammed.
    How is this any different from when we sign our names/emails to online petitons & send them to congress/senate.

    I wish the focus would stop being on "jam lines" when this is the method WE ARE TOLD BY CONGRESS to use to contact them: phone, email, fax.
  • please... (View Email) on December 20, 2006 at 3:55 PM
    First, if you want to even be considered seriously, you should take out slang and use proper english as you post. This is not some chat room or blog.

    With that said, I would like to first address "@ 05 grad". Even if you weren't trying to "jam lines", it is pretty ridiculus and childish to call many times over. Sure it may be that you are just voicing your opinion democratically. But really, I think that if you want to make a point make it logical.

    Your proposal for troops is very troubling in this violent time. You ask for our troops to be withdrawn from Iraq, and you propose that they get sent to Dardur. You ask for more violence to replace violence.

    To alumnae3, stop bashing Bush. It does not make you smarter, it does not make you more right, nor does it help your case. As I wrote earlier, it's too late to complain about Iraq. Iraq already happened and it's too late.

    Yes, someone next to me pointed out that as constituents it is your right to call. But, my only plea is that you offer a proper solution. I guarantee you, Darfur cannot be fixed with just troops. Violence is not quelled by violence or the show of force. Please reconsider. I wish you would seek a better solution.

    Just Remember:

    Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding.
  • Libertarian (View Email) on December 22, 2006 at 11:10 AM
    "truthfully, i dont believe that america has the right to police the world. but i do believe that america has a respnsibility to protect the freedoms and safety of people in other countries who are unable to stand up for themselves." - e in edge

    Please explain the difference
  • Flash on December 23, 2006 at 8:52 PM
    The call in was great because many do not know about the Darfur incident. This call in araised awareness about this unjustice.
  • sco lover on December 24, 2006 at 1:32 AM
    guys this is just awesome. this is representative democracy in action--representative democracy with conscience. big ups!
  • Wrong on December 29, 2006 at 1:38 PM
    The UNITED STATES should do nothing. It should take no action at all, on its own. The UNITED NATIONS needs to intervene, and clean this mess up. It is not the problem of the US alone, if the rest of the world wants to leave it, then we should do the same. Acting on our own hurts the US more than it could help others.

  • diane a. on December 31, 2006 at 3:13 PM
    To Eli Barnett-
    how is genocide a means of controlling the population? that is an apalling and inhuman idea. I know the facts, and have atleast a basic understanding of the conflict. But statistics aside, these are real people who really need help.There's nothing confusing about that.
  • rhonda (View Email) on January 16, 2007 at 2:16 PM
    Darfur Awareness Month and Art Contest
    Do you know anyone that would be willing to work with kids of all ages?

    Someone working on a major in child psychology or such. Please your ideas.

    1. They would become familar with the film The lost Boys of Sudan. http://shadowdistribution.com/ or
    http://www.lostboysfilm.com/index.html

    2. and the lesson plan.

    3. They would Organize groups and schools to participate. Contacting, explaining and scheduling.

    4. Work with the Womens Museum as to 'like' activities the last weekend in April. The film will be shown at the theatre there.

    5. Have a discussion and workshop after the film.

    6. Share information about Darfur and invite them to participate in the two year international contest of art, poetry, literature, film, photography and music.

    Darfur Awareness rhonda varsane 972.948.7498

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