opinions


The Need for Police Demilitarization

By Kalin Vassilev | Sept. 15, 2014, 12:56 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

The events of St. Louis show a very disturbing reality that contradicts this purpose, and something must be done to change the police force before any more Americans suffer as a result.


You might want to double check that

By Jacob Popper | Sept. 13, 2014, 12:17 p.m. | In Humor »

It's (almost) 2015, which is supposed to be Blair's Eightieth 80th anniversary, and last time I checked, 2015 minus 1925 equals 90, not 80


Two Wilson football players are off the team, but DCPS loses the game

By Aidan Keys | Sept. 12, 2014, 10:37 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Clearly, these non-Wilson students shouldn't be able to play for a Wilson team, but it wasn't these students' fault. Instead, the football coach at Wilson High School should take responsibility for letting the students on the team.


The tuition is too darn high

By Maximillian Foley-Keene | Sept. 11, 2014, 1:50 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

If a college degree is ever going to be a commodity students of all economic statuses can obtain, states and the federal government must end their reliance on college loans and make a renewed investment in student aid programs.


Goodbye, penny

By Robert Pfefferle | Sept. 11, 2014, 1:46 p.m. | In Humor »

No offense to Abe Lincoln, but it's time for the U.S. to retire the penny.


A lethal combination

By Zewde Ingram | Sept. 9, 2014, 1:40 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

A kid and a powerful Uzi submachine gun is a disastrous combination.


Happy camp is just happy talk

By Divya Rajagopal | Sept. 6, 2014, 2:13 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

North Korea's Children's Camp is just a false pretense of positivity for the government, instead of a genuine attempt by the government to create a nurturing community for children over the summer.


Shutting down on learning

By Eleanor Linafelt | Sept. 2, 2014, 8:58 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Blackboards, books and lessons or lectures from classroom teachers are all quickly fading into the past; taking their place are shiny tablet screens, E-books and online lessons and resources. More laptops and tablets available for student use will mean more distractions and less vital human interaction in the classroom.


Clinical trials for Ebola drug could cure thousands

By Neida Mbuia Joao | Aug. 28, 2014, 5:16 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

The WHO needs to begin a clinical trial with Ebola patients in West Africa to test the ZMapp's effectiveness and hopefully save thousands of lives. The first phase of this has already begun.


Why the #IceBucketChallenge isn't so stupid

By Brian Le | Aug. 27, 2014, 5:46 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

The ice bucket challenge requires people to pour a bucket of ice water on themselves or donate $100 to the ALS Association—or both—then nominate others to do the same. Millions of people around the world and countless celebrities are posting their challenge videos online.


Poor us: losing the last day of summer vacation

By Amalia Chiapperino | Aug. 25, 2014, 12:41 p.m. | In Humor »

But this year, in addition to all that, they'll also have to deal with something much worse: the wrath of approximately 2,200 teenagers, very annoyed at having to be at school.


A purely political effort

By Nicholas Shereikis | Aug. 20, 2014, 3:04 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

The recent push by conservatives like Wisconsin governor Scott Walker to repeal Common Core is purely political and has nothing to do with the effectiveness of the program.


Driverless cars ready to traverse cities and help save lives

By Kalin Vassilev | Aug. 6, 2014, 12:04 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Though it may seem unlikely now, the speed at which the technology is being developed suggests that driverless cars could be seen cruising down your street as early as 2017.


The not so minor, minor immigration problem

By Zewde Ingram | July 29, 2014, 9:10 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

In recent months, the flood of child immigrants from Central America has risen to chaotic and unsustainable proportions. The influx of unaccompanied immigrant children and mothers has amounted to an overwhelming humanitarian and policy issue.


Sea level rise will be coastal states' demise

By James Sleigh | July 28, 2014, 11 a.m. | In Op/Ed »

Scientists recently produced evidence that sea level rise will continue into the foreseeable future. Several low-lying islands and coastal areas are already experiencing the effects of rapidly swelling oceans and seas.


"Redskins" a little too strong on offense

By Arthi Vijaykumar | July 26, 2014, 12:28 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Snyder has resisted change for a while, but he must understand that changing the name would not only be compassionate to Native Americans who are hurt by the team name, it would also benefit himself and his team socially, financially and ethically.


In Syrian war, strength through neutrality

By Maximillian Foley-Keene | July 24, 2014, 11:40 a.m. | In Op/Ed »

The continuation of Assad's power in Syria brings the country closer to becoming ground zero of an all-out battle between the two major sects of Islam, Shia and Sunni, spanning the entire Middle East.


Violence propelled by entitlement

By Amalia Chiapperino | June 17, 2014, 11:01 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Rodger's viral address and the shooting that occurred soon after, reminded America of the lingering sexist tendencies and feelings of entitlement that continue to hinder gender equality and promote violence.


#RealChange from Hashtag Activism

By Sarah Trunk | June 11, 2014, 12:18 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Social media has redefined traditional social activism.


Just say hoNOrs

By Jacob Popper | June 11, 2014, 12:11 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Their obvious benefits have caused many people over the years to become strong supporters of the AP system, and in turn those people have strived to make them a choice nationwide. However, the AP curricula and tests need to be removed, because they are taking away necessary leisure time for students and furthering racial divides.


The Passion of the Eich

By Dylan Ahunhodjaev | May 8, 2014, 7:41 a.m. | In Op/Ed »

Why was Brendan Eich's resignation wrong, and what can we learn from this situation going forward?


In defense of "slacking"

By Dylan Ahunhodjaev | April 30, 2014, 12:44 p.m. | In Opinions »

I get eight hours of sleep every single night. Gasp! (This is the part where you gasp). Yes, it's true—I'm a Blair junior taking three AP courses and yet somehow, miraculously, in defiance of all logic and reason, laughing in the face of "junioritis" and similar afflictions, I sleep like a baby night in and night out.


When is a joke not a joke?

By Sarah Trunk | April 21, 2014, 12:49 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Critics fail to understand the point of satire such as Colbert's � satire, in context, is necessary to criticize essential issues.


The College Readiness Contest

By Sarah Trunk | April 8, 2014, 12:45 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Although the new SAT has good intentions, it won't fix the old SAT’s failure to fulfill the test's purpose-- to provide colleges with a fair and accurate evaluation of students' ability to succeed in college.


An alert for every occasion

By Dylan Ahunhodjaev | April 2, 2014, 1:51 p.m. | In Op/Ed »

Protecting children should and has been a top priority for citizens and law enforcement, but what about all of the other crimes that take place daily in this country? With an AMBER-style alert system in place on a statewide or regional basis, police could respond more quickly to and increase awareness of crimes taking place in communities everywhere.

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